Recruiting - How and Where to Find Your Next CRO

The purpose of the Chief Revenue Officer (CRO) is to drive organic revenue growth by leveraging each revenue-generating function and department within your organization.

This is a position that was born in the Silicon Valley SaaS sector, but it's no longer isolated to the tech space. More companies are finding value in adding the CRO position to their C-suite, from startups to Fortune 500 companies.

Whether you're a company like Continental Airlines, which has had a CRO for nearly two decades, or a business that is just realizing the value of this position, it's a specialized role. Here is what a CRO can bring to the table and what you need to know to find your company's next CRO.

Topics: CRO Chief Revenue Officer Hiring HR

Is it Worth it to Create/Carve Out Space for a CRO?

aka How Valuable is a CRO?

Unlike a more narrowly focused Chief Sales Officer or Chief Marketing Officer, a Chief Revenue Officer (CRO) is responsible for the entire array of revenue-driving activities – scaling revenue, overseeing sales and marketing teams, managing partner relationships, ensuring client success throughout the buyer’s journey, and maintaining brand integrity. As an organization grows, the need for a CRO often becomes more evident.

Some companies decide to onboard a CRO to better align burgeoning sales and marketing teams around a singular business goal, while others choose to bring in a CRO to bolster channel expansion efforts. Either way, a CRO will oversee the business processes and staff that accompany the end-to-end revenue value chain.

Topics: Leadership CRO Chief Revenue Officer HR Collaboration

Resolving CFO and CRO Conflicts

Sitting through a tense meeting where finance and sales are positioned on opposite side of the table engaged in conflict is as iconic in corporate America as a row of cubicles. In fact, for all levels of managers and executives, serving time in battle during these situations for their respective teams is essentially a rite of passage.

In these all too common scenarios, both sides often emerge worse for the wear instead of uniting to drive business growth. The result is a corporate landscape where revenue potential remains unfulfilled and employee satisfaction suffers. Organizational stagnation and, ultimately, demise can quickly follow when conflict breeds.

To attain sustainable business profitability, the issue of clashing CFO and CRO perspectives needs to be addressed and the entire premise of assigning roles needs to be examined.

Topics: CRO Chief Revenue Officer Hiring HR Management Business Culture Collaboration

Average CRO Salary Expectations (Chief Revenue Officer)

The CRO (Chief Revenue Officer) is expected to be paid well because it is more demanding, complex and challenging than either a Sales VP or a Marketing VP role.  As we review compensation, it is helpful to remember that titles are not always a representation of responsibility. CROs who finds themselves closing the initial sale, then outsourcing the upsell, cross-sell and renewal processes to functional peers, might find 'VP of Sales' to be a better title.

Topics: CRO Chief Revenue Officer HR Compensation

The Benefits of Using DISC Assessments to Grow Sales

Knowing the secret to effective marketing to grow sales and drive profit is often elusive, even to the those with expert marketing skills.  DISC Assessments can help you have better insights into the minds of your marketing and sales team, customers and prospects. Today I would like to share with you the importance of DISC Assessments for growing revenue.

Topics: B2B Sales HR Sales Training DISC

FLSA Exemptions Update - Commission Salespeople, Executives & Overtime

 UPDATE:  11-22-2016   In a ruling Tuesday, U.S. Court Judge Amos L. Mazzant III of the Eastern District of Texas barred the U.S. from implementing the new overtime rules, saying the new revision improperly created a salary test for determining which workers fall under the Fair Labor Standards Act’s so-called “white collar” exemption.  Read the court ruling here.  This puts the following information on a temporary hold. 



On 12/1/16 a new FLSA rule by the Department of Labor will require you to either pay an exempt (salaried) employee an hourly rate along with overtime pay or increase their pay to meet the new threshold limits of $47,476.

Under the proposed rules, the minimum salary threshold would increase from $23,660 per year ($455 per week) to $50,440 ($970 per week) in 2016. The current “highly compensated employee” exemption would increase from $100,000 to $122,148 per year. According to the DOL, as many as five million American workers who are currently exempt could become eligible for overtime protection.

Topics: Commissions Legal HR Compensation